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Author Noy, L.; Weiser, N.; Friedman, J.
Title Synchrony in Joint Action Is Directed by Each Participant's Motor Control System Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Frontiers in Psychology Abbreviated Journal Front. Psychol.
Volume 8 Issue Pages 531
Keywords visuomotor tracking; mirror game; intermittent control; joint action; motor control
Abstract (up) In this work, we ask how the probability of achieving synchrony in joint action is affected by the choice of motion parameters of each individual. We use the mirror game paradigm to study how changes in leader�s motion parameters, specifically frequency and peak velocity, affect the probability of entering the state of co-confidence (CC) motion: a dyadic state of synchronized, smooth and co-predictive motions. In order to systematically study this question, we used a one-person version of the mirror game, where the participant mirrored piece-wise rhythmic movements produced by a computer on a graphics tablet. We systematically varied the frequency and peak velocity of the movements to determine how these parameters affect the likelihood of synchronized joint action. To assess synchrony in the mirror game we used the previously developed marker of co-confident (CC) motions: smooth, jitter-less and synchronized motions indicative of co-predicative control. We found that when mirroring movements with low frequencies (i.e., long duration movements), the participants never showed CC, and as the frequency of the stimuli increased, the probability of observing CC also increased. This finding is discussed in the framework of motor control studies showing an upper limit on the duration of smooth motion. We confirmed the relationship between motion parameters and the probability to perform CC with three sets of data of open-ended two-player mirror games. These findings demonstrate that when performing movements together, there are optimal movement frequencies to use in order to maximize the possibility of entering a state of synchronized joint action. It also shows that the ability to perform synchronized joint action is constrained by the properties of our motor control systems.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1664-1078 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 84
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Author Friedman, J.; Korman, M.
Title Kinematic Strategies Underlying Improvement in the Acquisition of a Sequential Finger Task with Self-Generated vs. Cued Repetition Training Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication PLoS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One
Volume 7 Issue 12 Pages e52063
Keywords
Abstract (up) Many motor skills, such as typing, consist of articulating simple movements into novel sequences that are executed faster and smoother with practice. Dynamics of re-organization of these movement sequences with multi-session training and its dependence on the amount of self-regulation of pace during training is not yet fully understood. In this study, participants practiced a sequence of key presses. Training sessions consisted of either externally (Cued) or self-initiated (Uncued) training. Long-term improvements in performance speed were mainly due to reducing gaps between finger movements in both groups, but Uncued training induced higher gains. The underlying kinematic strategies producing these changes and the representation of the trained sequence differed significantly across subjects, although net gains in speed were similar. The differences in long-term memory due to the type of training and the variation in strategies between subjects, suggest that the different neural mechanisms may subserve the improvements observed in overall performance.
Address Department of Cognitive Science, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia ; ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23272210 Approved no
Call Number Serial 41
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Author Kaufman-Cohen, Y.; Friedman, J.; Levanon, Y.; Jacobi, G.; Doron, N.; Portnoy, S.
Title Wrist Plane of Motion and Range During Daily Activities Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication American Journal of Occupational Therapy Abbreviated Journal Am J Occup Ther
Volume 72 Issue 6 Pages 1-10
Keywords
Abstract (up) OBJECTIVE. The dart-throwing motion (DTM) is a multiplane wrist motion that is needed for many daily occupations. Mobilization along the DTM plane may be essential for rehabilitation after wrist injury, but DTM angles are reported for the dominant hand alone, so their relevance to injury in the nondominant hand cannot be surmised. The aim of this study was to quantify the DTM plane angles for both hands during different activities of daily living (ADLs).

METHOD. Forty-three healthy participants wore a twin-axis electrogoniometer during ADLs.

RESULTS. No significant differences were found between the DTM plane angles of the dominant (20°�45°) and nondominant (15°�40°) hands. These angles varied by task and across participants.

CONCLUSION. The DTM plane is a functional motion used by both hands during ADLs. Because the DTM plane angle differs among hands, tasks, and individual clients, wrist rehabilitation involving the DTM plane should not be limited to a singular DTM plane angle.OBJECTIVE. The dart-throwing motion (DTM) is a multiplane wrist motion that is needed for many daily occupations. Mobilization along the DTM plane may be essential for rehabilitation after wrist injury, but DTM angles are reported for the dominant hand alone, so their relevance to injury in the nondominant hand cannot be surmised. The aim of this study was to quantify the DTM plane angles for both hands during different activities of daily living (ADLs).

METHOD. Forty-three healthy participants wore a twin-axis electrogoniometer during ADLs.

RESULTS. No significant differences were found between the DTM plane angles of the dominant (20°�45°) and nondominant (15°�40°) hands. These angles varied by task and across participants.

CONCLUSION. The DTM plane is a functional motion used by both hands during ADLs. Because the DTM plane angle differs among hands, tasks, and individual clients, wrist rehabilitation involving the DTM plane should not be limited to a singular DTM plane angle.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0272-9490 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 92
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Author Portnoy, S.; Mimouni-Bloch, A.; Rosenberg, L.; Offek, H.; Berman, T.; Kochavi, M.; Orman, G.; Friedman, J.
Title Graphical Product Quality and Muscle Activity in Children With Mild Disabilities Drawing on a Horizontally or Vertically Oriented Tablet Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication American Journal of Occupational Therapy Abbreviated Journal Am J Occup Ther
Volume 72 Issue 6 Pages 1-7
Keywords
Abstract (up) OBJECTIVE. We compared performance level and muscle activity patterns during shape copying and tracing in two positions, while sitting at a desk and while standing in front of a wall, between typically developing (TD) preschool children and children with mild disabilities (MD).

METHOD. Twenty-two TD children (8 boys, 14 girls; mean [M] age 5 5.2 yr, standard deviation [SD] 5 0.1) and 13 children with MD (9 boys, 4 girls; M age 5 4.9 yr, SD 5 0.5) participated in this study.

RESULTS. The children performed faster and smoother movements when copying shapes on the vertical surface, with no reduction of accuracy, than on the horizontal surface. Children with MD exerted their upper trapezius while performing the short tasks on the vertical surface compared with their muscle activity on the horizontal surface.

CONCLUSION. Incorporating short copying or drawing tasks on a vertical surface may increase the control of proximal muscles and ease graphomotor performance in children with MD.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0272-9490 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Penn State @ write.to.jason @ Serial 91
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Author Raveh, E.; Portnoy, S.; Friedman, J.
Title Myoelectric Prosthesis Users Improve Performance Time and Accuracy Using Vibrotactile Feedback When Visual Feedback Is Disturbed Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Arch Phys Med Rehabil
Volume 99 Issue 11 Pages 2263-2270
Keywords Amputation; Prosthesis; Rehabilitation; Sensory feedback; Visual feedback
Abstract (up) OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of adding vibrotactile feedback (VTF) in myoelectric prosthesis users during performance of a functional task when visual feedback is disturbed. DESIGN: A repeated-measures design with a counter-balanced order of 3 conditions. SETTING: Laboratory setting. PARTICIPANTS: Transradial amputees using a myoelectric prosthesis with normal or corrected eyesight (N=12, median age 65+/-13y). Exclusion criteria were orthopedic or neurologic problems. INTERVENTIONS: All participants performed the modified Box and Blocks Test, grasping and manipulating 16 blocks over a partition using their myoelectric prosthesis. This was performed 3 times: in full light, in a dark room without VTF, and in a dark room with VTF. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Performance time, that is, the time needed to transfer 1 block, and accuracy during performance, measured by number of empty grips, empty transitions with no block and block drops from the hand. RESULTS: Significant differences were found in all outcome measures when VTF was added, with improved performance time (4.2 vs 5.3s) and a reduced number of grasping errors (3.0 vs 6.5 empty grips, 1.5 vs 4 empty transitions, 2.0 vs 4.5 block drops). CONCLUSIONS: Adding VTF to myoelectric prosthesis users has positive effects on performance time and accuracy when visual feedback is disturbed.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0003-9993 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29935153 Approved no
Call Number Serial 96
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