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Author (up) Kaufman-Cohen, Y.; Friedman, J.; Levanon, Y.; Jacobi, G.; Doron, N.; Portnoy, S.
Title Wrist Plane of Motion and Range During Daily Activities Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication American Journal of Occupational Therapy Abbreviated Journal Am J Occup Ther
Volume 72 Issue 6 Pages 1-10
Keywords
Abstract OBJECTIVE. The dart-throwing motion (DTM) is a multiplane wrist motion that is needed for many daily occupations. Mobilization along the DTM plane may be essential for rehabilitation after wrist injury, but DTM angles are reported for the dominant hand alone, so their relevance to injury in the nondominant hand cannot be surmised. The aim of this study was to quantify the DTM plane angles for both hands during different activities of daily living (ADLs).

METHOD. Forty-three healthy participants wore a twin-axis electrogoniometer during ADLs.

RESULTS. No significant differences were found between the DTM plane angles of the dominant (20°�45°) and nondominant (15°�40°) hands. These angles varied by task and across participants.

CONCLUSION. The DTM plane is a functional motion used by both hands during ADLs. Because the DTM plane angle differs among hands, tasks, and individual clients, wrist rehabilitation involving the DTM plane should not be limited to a singular DTM plane angle.OBJECTIVE. The dart-throwing motion (DTM) is a multiplane wrist motion that is needed for many daily occupations. Mobilization along the DTM plane may be essential for rehabilitation after wrist injury, but DTM angles are reported for the dominant hand alone, so their relevance to injury in the nondominant hand cannot be surmised. The aim of this study was to quantify the DTM plane angles for both hands during different activities of daily living (ADLs).

METHOD. Forty-three healthy participants wore a twin-axis electrogoniometer during ADLs.

RESULTS. No significant differences were found between the DTM plane angles of the dominant (20°�45°) and nondominant (15°�40°) hands. These angles varied by task and across participants.

CONCLUSION. The DTM plane is a functional motion used by both hands during ADLs. Because the DTM plane angle differs among hands, tasks, and individual clients, wrist rehabilitation involving the DTM plane should not be limited to a singular DTM plane angle.
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ISSN 0272-9490 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 92
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Author (up) Kaufman-Cohen, Y.; Levanon, Y.; Friedman, J.; Yaniv, Y.; Portnoy, S.
Title Home exercise in the dart-throwing motion plane after distal radius fractures: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Hand Therapy Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
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Address
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Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 103
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Author (up) Kaufman-Cohen, Y.; Portnoy, S.; Levanon, Y.; Friedman, J.
Title Does Object Height Affect the Dart Throwing Motion Angle during Seated Activities of Daily Living? Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Motor Behavior Abbreviated Journal J Mot Behav
Volume Issue Pages 1-10
Keywords dart throwing motion (DTM); heights; kinematics; seated activities of daily living (ADL); upper extremity; wrist rehabilitation
Abstract Complex wrist motions are needed to complete various daily activities. Analyzing the multidimensional motion of the wrist is crucial for understanding our functional movement. Several studies have shown that numerous activities of daily livings (ADLs) are performed using an oblique plane of wrist motion from radial-extension to ulnar-flexion, named the Dart Throwing Motion (DTM) plane. To the best of our knowledge, the DTM plane angle performed during ADLs has not been compared between different heights (e.g. table, shoulder and head height), as is common when performing day-to-day tasks. In this study, we compared DTM plane angles when performing different ADLs at three different heights and examined the relationship between DTM plane angles and limb position. We found that height had a significant effect on the DTM plane angles – the mean DTM plane angle was greater at the lower level compared to the mid and higher levels. A significant effect of shoulder orientation on mean DTM plane angles was shown in the sagittal and coronal planes. Our findings support the importance of training daily tasks at different heights during rehabilitation following wrist injuries, in order to explore a large range of DTM angles, to accommodate needs of common ADLs.
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-2895 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31359843 Approved no
Call Number Serial 100
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Author (up) Krasovsky, T.; Weiss, P.L.; Zuckerman, O.; Bar, A.; Keren-Capelovitch, T.; Friedman, J.
Title DataSpoon: Validation of an Instrumented Spoon for Assessment of Self-Feeding Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Sensors (Basel, Switzerland) Abbreviated Journal Sensors (Basel)
Volume 20 Issue 7 Pages
Keywords concurrent validity; feasibility; kinematics; outcome assessment; rehabilitation
Abstract Clinically feasible assessment of self-feeding is important for adults and children with motor impairments such as stroke or cerebral palsy. However, no validated assessment tool for self-feeding kinematics exists. This work presents an initial validation of an instrumented spoon (DataSpoon) developed as an evaluation tool for self-feeding kinematics. Ten young, healthy adults (three male; age 27.2 +/- 6.6 years) used DataSpoon at three movement speeds (slow, comfortable, fast) and with three different grips: “natural”, power and rotated power grip. Movement kinematics were recorded concurrently using DataSpoon and a magnetic motion capture system (trakSTAR). Eating events were automatically identified for both systems and kinematic measures were extracted from yaw, pitch and roll (YPR) data as well as from acceleration and tangential velocity profiles. Two-way, mixed model Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and 95% limits of agreement (LOA) were computed to determine agreement between the systems for each kinematic variable. Most variables demonstrated fair to excellent agreement. Agreement for measures of duration, pitch and roll exceeded 0.8 (excellent agreement) for >80% of speed and grip conditions, whereas lower agreement (ICC < 0.46) was measured for tangential velocity and acceleration. A bias of 0.01-0.07 s (95% LOA [-0.54, 0.53] to [-0.63, 0.48]) was calculated for measures of duration. DataSpoon enables automatic detection of self-feeding using simple, affordable movement sensors. Using movement kinematics, variables associated with self-feeding can be identified and aid clinical reasoning for adults and children with motor impairments.
Address Department of Physical Therapy, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 6997801, Israel
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1424-8220 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32283624; PMCID:PMC7180859 Approved no
Call Number Serial 104
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Author (up) Latash, M.L., Friedman, J., Kim, S.W., Feldman, A.G., Zatsiorsky, V.M.
Title Prehension Synergies and Control with Referent Hand Configurations Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Experimental Brain Research Abbreviated Journal Exp Brain Res
Volume 202 Issue 1 Pages 213-229
Keywords
Abstract We used the framework of the equilibrium-point hypothesis (in its updated form based on the notion of referent configuration) to investigate the multi-digit synergies at two levels of a hypothetical hierarchy involved in prehensile actions. Synergies were analyzed at the thumb-virtual finger level (virtual finger is an imaginary digit with the mechanical action equivalent to that of the four actual fingers) and at the individual finger level. The subjects performed very quick vertical movements of a handle into a target. A load could be attached off-center to provide a pronation or supination torque. In a few trials, the handle was unexpectedly fixed to the table and the digits slipped off the sensors. In such trials, the hand stopped at a higher vertical position and rotated into pronation or supination depending on the expected torque. The aperture showed non-monotonic changes with a large, fast decrease and further increase, ending up with a smaller distance between the thumb and the fingers as compared to unperturbed trials. Multi-digit synergies were quantified using indices of co-variation between digit forces and moments of force across unperturbed trials. Prior to the lifting action, high synergy indices were observed at the individual finger level while modest indices were observed at the thumb-virtual finger level. During the lifting action, the synergies at the individual finger level disappeared while the synergy indices became higher at the thumb-virtual finger level. The results support the basic premise that, within a given task, setting a referent configuration may be described with a few referent values of variables that influence the equilibrium state, to which the system is attracted. Moreover, the referent configuration hypothesis can help interpret the data related to the trade-off between synergies at different hierarchical levels.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
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Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Penn State @ write.to.jason @ Serial 19
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