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Author (up) Portnoy, S.; Rosenberg, L.; Alazraki, T.; Elyakim, E.; Friedman, J.
Title Differences in Muscle Activity Patterns and Graphical Product Quality in Children Copying and Tracing Activities on Horizontal or Vertical Surfaces Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology Abbreviated Journal Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology
Volume 25 Issue 3 Pages 540�547
Keywords Motor equivalence; Electromyography; Tablet; Occupational Therapy; Muscle fatigue; Motor control
Abstract The observation that a given task, e.g. producing a signature, looks similar when created by different motor commands and different muscles groups is known as motor equivalence. Relatively little data exists regarding the characteristics of motor equivalence in children. In this study, we compared the level of performance when performing a tracing task and copying figures in two common postures: while sitting at a desk and while standing in front of a wall, among preschool children. In addition, we compared muscle activity patterns in both postures. Specifically, we compared the movements of 35 five- to six-year old children, recording the same movements of copying figures and path tracing on an electronic tablet in both a horizontal orientation, while sitting, and a vertical orientation, while standing. Different muscle activation patterns were observed between the postures, however no significant difference in the performance level was found, providing evidence of motor equivalence at this young age. The study presents a straightforward method of assessing motor equivalence that can be extended to other stages of development as well as motor disorders.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1050-6411 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 77
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Author (up) Prushansky, T.; Kaplan-Gadasi, L.; Friedman, J.
Title The relationship between thoracic posture and ultrasound echo intensity of muscles spanning this region in healthy men and women Type Journal Article
Year 2022 Publication Physiotherapy Theory and Practice Abbreviated Journal Physiother Theory Pract
Volume Issue Pages 1-9
Keywords Ultrasound imaging; muscle echogenicity; posture; thoracic kyphosis
Abstract PURPOSE: Skeletal muscle echogenicity intensity (EI) is considered a measure of muscle quality, being associated with old age and pathologies. Whether EI variations can be identified in healthy adults, due to habitual shortened or elongated muscle position is unknown. Thus, this study aimed to assess the relationship between thoracic kyphosis angulation and EI scores of muscles spanning this region ((Lower Trapezius (LT), Rhomboid Major (RM), Erector Spine (ES)) in healthy young people and in addition to examine the relationship between the change in thoracic kyphosis angle from relaxed to upright position (� degrees ) and the EI of these muscles. METHODS: Thoracic kyphosis in relaxed and erect standing was measured using a digital inclinometer in 29 healthy adults (16 women, 13 men), aged 25-35 years. The thoracic kyphosis angles including the difference between relaxed and erect postures (� degrees ) were correlated to the EI scores of right and left LT, RM and ES. RESULTS: No significant differences in EI were found between the 3 muscles EI or between sides, hence they were pooled together to a total thoracic EI score (TTEI). Although the TTEI did not correlate with relaxed or erect thoracic kyphosis, it was significantly but negatively correlated with � degrees in the entire group: Pearson's correlation coefficient of r = -0.544; p = .01 and in men; r = -0.732; p = .01, failing to reach significance in women; r = -0.457. CONCLUSION: The negative association between the EI of the explored muscles and � degrees could imply a possible relationship between these muscles range of movement excursions and their composition.
Address Department of Physical Therapy, the Stanley Stayer School of Health Professions, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0959-3985 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:35125048 Approved no
Call Number Serial 116
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Author (up) Raveh, E.; Friedman, J.; Portnoy, S.
Title Visuomotor behaviors and performance in a dual-task paradigm with and without vibrotactile feedback when using a myoelectric controlled hand Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Assistive Technology Abbreviated Journal Assistive Technology
Volume 30 Issue Pages 274-280
Keywords
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1040-0435 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 85
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Author (up) Raveh, E.; Friedman, J.; Portnoy, S.
Title Evaluation of the effects of adding vibrotactile feedback to myoelectric prosthesis users on performance and visual attention in a dual-task paradigm Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Clinical Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Clin Rehabil
Volume 99 Issue 11 Pages 2263-2270
Keywords
Abstract Objective: To evaluate the effects of adding vibrotactile feedback to myoelectric prosthesis users on the performance time and visual attention in a dual-task paradigm.

Design: A repeated-measures design with a counterbalanced order of two conditions.

Setting: Laboratory setting.

Subjects: Transradial amputees using a myoelectric prosthesis with normal or corrected eyesight (N=12, median age=65 ± 13 years). Exclusion criteria were orthopedic or neurologic problems.

Interventions: Subjects performed grasping tasks with their prosthesis, while controlling a virtual car on a road with their intact hand. The dual task was performed twice: with and without vibrotactile feedback.

Main measures: Performance time of each of the grasping tasks and gaze behavior, measured by the number of times the subjects shifted their gaze toward their hand, the relative time they applied their attention to the screen, and percentage of error in the secondary task.

Results: The mean performance time was significantly shorter (P=0.024) when using vibrotactile feedback (93.2 ± 9.6 seconds) compared with the performance time measured when vibrotactile feedback was not available (107.8 ± 20.3seconds). No significant differences were found between the two conditions in the number of times the gaze shifted from the screen to the hand, in the time the subjects applied their attention to the screen, and in the time the virtual car was off-road, as a percentage of the total game time

(51.4 ± 15.7 and 50.2 ± 19.5, respectively).

Conclusion: Adding vibrotactile feedback improved performance time during grasping in a dual-task paradigm. Prosthesis users may use vibrotactile feedback to perform better during daily tasks, when multiple cognitive demands are present.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0269-2155 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Penn State @ write.to.jason @ Serial 89
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Author (up) Raveh, E.; Portnoy, S.; Friedman, J.
Title Adding vibrotactile feedback to a myoelectric-controlled hand improves performance when online visual feedback is disturbed Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Human Movement Science Abbreviated Journal Hum Mov Sci
Volume 58 Issue Pages 32-40
Keywords Myoelectric prostheses; Sensorimotor control; Upper limb amputation; Visual feedback
Abstract We investigated whether adding vibrotactile feedback to a myoelectric-controlled hand, when visual feedback is disturbed, can improve performance during a functional test. For this purpose, able-bodied subjects, activating a myoelectric-controlled hand attached to their right hand performed the modified Box & Blocks test, grasping and manipulating wooden blocks over a partition. This was performed in 3 conditions, using a repeated-measures design: in full light, in a dark room where visual feedback was disturbed and no auditory feedback – one time with the addition of tactile feedback provided during object grasping and manipulation, and one time without any tactile feedback. The average time needed to transfer one block was measured, and an infrared camera was used to give information on the number of grasping errors during performance of the test. Our results show that when vibrotactile feedback was provided, performance time was reduced significantly, compared with when no vibrotactile feedback was available. Furthermore, the accuracy of grasping and manipulation was improved, reflected by significantly fewer errors during test performance. In conclusion, adding vibrotactile feedback to a myoelectric-controlled hand has positive effects on functional performance when visual feedback is disturbed. This may have applications to current myoelectric-controlled hands, as adding tactile feedback may help prosthesis users to improve their functional ability during daily life activities in different environments, particularly when limited visual feedback is available or desirable.
Address Physical Therapy Department, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel. Electronic address: jason@post.tau.ac.il
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0167-9457 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29353091 Approved no
Call Number Serial 88
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