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Author Friedman, J.; Korman, M.
Title Kinematic Strategies Underlying Improvement in the Acquisition of a Sequential Finger Task with Self-Generated vs. Cued Repetition Training Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication PLoS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One
Volume 7 Issue 12 Pages (up) e52063
Keywords
Abstract Many motor skills, such as typing, consist of articulating simple movements into novel sequences that are executed faster and smoother with practice. Dynamics of re-organization of these movement sequences with multi-session training and its dependence on the amount of self-regulation of pace during training is not yet fully understood. In this study, participants practiced a sequence of key presses. Training sessions consisted of either externally (Cued) or self-initiated (Uncued) training. Long-term improvements in performance speed were mainly due to reducing gaps between finger movements in both groups, but Uncued training induced higher gains. The underlying kinematic strategies producing these changes and the representation of the trained sequence differed significantly across subjects, although net gains in speed were similar. The differences in long-term memory due to the type of training and the variation in strategies between subjects, suggest that the different neural mechanisms may subserve the improvements observed in overall performance.
Address Department of Cognitive Science, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia ; ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23272210 Approved no
Call Number Serial 41
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Author Friedman, J.; Raveh, E.; Weiss, T.; Itkin, S.; Niv, D.; Hani, M.; Portnoy, S.
Title Applying Incongruent Visual-Tactile Stimuli during Object Transfer with Vibro-Tactile Feedback Type
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Visualized Experiments : JoVE Abbreviated Journal J Vis Exp
Volume 147 Issue Pages (up) e59493
Keywords
Abstract The application of incongruent sensory signals that involves disrupted tactile feedback is rarely explored, specifically with the presence of vibrotactile feedback (VTF). This protocol aims to test the effect of VTF on the response to incongruent visual-tactile stimuli. The tactile feedback is acquired by grasping a block and moving it across a partition. The visual feedback is a real-time virtual presentation of the moving block, acquired using a motion capture system. The congruent feedback is the reliable presentation of the movement of the block, so that the subject feels that the block is grasped and see it move along with the path of the hand. The incongruent feedback appears as the movement of the block diverts from the actual movement path, so that it seems to drop from the hand when it is actually still held by the subject, thereby contradicting the tactile feedback. Twenty subjects (age 30.2 +/- 16.3) repeated 16 block transfers, while their hand was hidden. These were repeated with VTF and without VTF (total of 32 block transfers). Incongruent stimuli were presented randomly twice within the 16 repetitions in each condition (with and without VTF). Each subject was asked to rate the difficulty level of performing the task with and without the VTF. There were no statistically significant differences in the length of the hand paths and durations between transfers recorded with congruent and incongruent visual-tactile signals – with and without the VTF. The perceived difficulty level of performing the task with the VTF significantly correlated with the normalized path length of the block with VTF (r = 0.675, p = 0.002). This setup is used to quantify the additive or reductive value of VTF during motor function that involves incongruent visual-tactile stimuli. Possible applications are prosthetics design, smart sport-wear, or any other garments that incorporate VTF.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1940-087X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31180348 Approved no
Call Number Serial 101
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Author Ezrati, O.; Friedman, J.; Dar, R.
Title Attenuation of access to internal states in high obsessive-compulsive individuals might increase susceptibility to false feedback: Evidence from a visuo-motor hand-reaching task Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry Abbreviated Journal Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry
Volume 65 Issue Pages (up) 101445
Keywords Obsessive-compulsive disorder; Movement; Agency; Proprioception; Proxies
Abstract Background and objectives

The Seeking Proxies for Internal States (SPIS) model of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) posits that obsessive-compulsive (OC) individuals have attenuated access to their internal states. Hence, they seek and rely on proxies, or discernible substitutes for these internal states. In previous studies, participants with high OC tendencies and OCD patients, compared to controls, showed increased reliance on external proxies and were more influenced by false feedback when judging their internal states. This study is the first to examine the effects of false feedback on performance of hand movements in participants with high and low OC tendencies.

Method

Thirty-four participants with high OC tendencies and 34 participants with low OC tendencies were asked to perform accurate hand reaches without visual feedback in two separate sessions of a computerized hand-reaching task: once after valid feedback training of their hand location and once with false-rotated feedback. We assessed the accuracy and directional adaptation of participants' reaches.

Results

As predicted, high OC participants evidenced a larger decrease in their hand positioning accuracy after training with false feedback compared to low OC participants.

Limitations

The generalization of our findings to OCD requires replication with a clinical sample.

Conclusions

These results suggest that in addition to self-perceptions, motor performance of OC individuals is prone to be overly influenced by false feedback, possibly due to attenuated access to proprioceptive cues. These findings may be particularly relevant to understanding the distorted sense of agency in OCD.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0005-7916 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 95
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Author Cantergi, D.; Awasthi, B.; Friedman, J.
Title Moving objects by imagination? Amount of finger movement and pendulum length determine success in the Chevreul pendulum illusion Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Human Movement Science Abbreviated Journal Human Movement Science
Volume 80 Issue Pages (up) 102879
Keywords
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0167-9457 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 111
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Author Wilf, M.; Korakin, A.; Bahat, Y.; Koren, O.; Galor, N.; Dagan, O.; Wright, W.G.; Friedman, J.; Plotnik, M.
Title Using virtual reality-based neurocognitive testing and eye tracking to study naturalistic cognitive-motor performance Type Journal Article
Year 2024 Publication Neuropsychologia Abbreviated Journal Neuropsychologia
Volume 194 Issue Pages (up) 108744
Keywords Humans; Aged; *Eye-Tracking Technology; Cognition; Executive Function; *Virtual Reality; Aging; Color trails test; Fall risk; Hand kinematics; Pupil; Virtual reality
Abstract Natural human behavior arises from continuous interactions between the cognitive and motor domains. However, assessments of cognitive abilities are typically conducted using pen and paper tests, i.e., in isolation from “real life” cognitive-motor behavior and in artificial contexts. In the current study, we aimed to assess cognitive-motor task performance in a more naturalistic setting while recording multiple motor and eye tracking signals. Specifically, we aimed to (i) delineate the contribution of cognitive and motor components to overall task performance and (ii) probe for a link between cognitive-motor performance and pupil size. To that end, we used a virtual reality (VR) adaptation of a well-established neurocognitive test for executive functions, the 'Color Trails Test' (CTT). The VR-CTT involves performing 3D reaching movements to follow a trail of numbered targets. To tease apart the cognitive and motor components of task performance, we included two additional conditions: a condition where participants only used their eyes to perform the CTT task (using an eye tracking device), incurring reduced motor demands, and a condition where participants manually tracked visually-cued targets without numbers on them, incurring reduced cognitive demands. Our results from a group of 30 older adults (>65) showed that reducing cognitive demands shortened completion times more extensively than reducing motor demands. Conditions with higher cognitive demands had longer target search time, as well as decreased movement execution velocity and head-hand coordination. We found larger pupil sizes in the more cognitively demanding conditions, and an inverse correlation between pupil size and completion times across individuals in all task conditions. Lastly, we found a possible link between VR-CTT performance measures and clinical signatures of participants (fallers versus non-fallers). In summary, performance and pupil parameters were mainly dependent on task cognitive load, while maintaining systematic interindividual differences. We suggest that this paradigm opens the possibility for more detailed profiling of individual cognitive-motor performance capabilities in older adults and other at-risk populations.
Address Center of Advanced Technologies in Rehabilitation, Sheba Medical Center, Israel; Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; Sagol School of Neuroscience, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. Electronic address: Meir.Plotnik@sheba.health.gov.il
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0028-3932 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:38072162 Approved no
Call Number Serial 123
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