|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Frenkel-Toledo, S.; Bentin, S.; Perry, A.; Liebermann, D.G.; Soroker, N.
Title Dynamics of the EEG Power in the Frequency and Spatial Domains During Observation and Execution of Manual Movements Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Brain Research Abbreviated Journal (up) Brain Res
Volume 1509 Issue Pages 43-57
Keywords
Abstract Mu suppression is the attenuation of EEG power in the alpha frequency range (8-12Hz) while executing or observing a motor action. Whereas typically observed at central scalp sites, there are diverging reports about the extent of the attenuation over the cortical mantle, its exact frequency range and the specificity of this phenomenon. We investigated the modulation of EEG oscillations in frequency-bands from 4 to 12Hz at frontal, central, parietal and occipital sites during the execution of manual movements and during observation of similar actions from allocentric (i.e., facing the actor) and egocentric (i.e., seeing the actor from behind) viewpoints. Suppression was determined relative to observation of a non-biological movement. Action observation elicited greater suppression in the lower (8-10Hz) compared to the higher mu range (10-12Hz), and greater suppression in the entire 4-12Hz range at frontal and central sites compared to parietal and occipital sites. In addition, suppression tended to be greater during observation of a motor action from allocentric compared to egocentric viewpoints. During execution of movement, suppression of the EEG occurred primarily in the higher alpha range and was absent at occipital sites. In the theta range (4-8Hz), the EEG amplitude was suppressed during action observation and execution. The results suggest a functional distinction between modulation of mu and alpha rhythms, and between the higher and lower ranges of the mu rhythms. The activity of the presumed human mirror neuron system seems primarily evident in the lower mu range and in the theta range.
Address Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel; Department of Neurological Rehabilitation, Loewenstein Hospital, Raanana, Israel. Electronic address: silvi197@bezeqint.net
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0006-8993 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23500633 Approved no
Call Number Serial 68
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liebermann, D.G.; Buchman, A.S.; Franks, I.M.
Title Enhancement of motor rehabilitation through the use of information technologies Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Clinical Biomechanics (Bristol, Avon) Abbreviated Journal (up) Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon)
Volume 21 Issue 1 Pages 8-20
Keywords Biotechnology/*methods; Humans; Medical Informatics/*methods; Motion Therapy, Continuous Passive/*methods; Movement Disorders/*rehabilitation; Musculoskeletal Manipulations/methods; Rehabilitation/*methods; Robotics/*methods; Therapy, Computer-Assisted/*methods
Abstract The recent development of information technologies has dramatically increased the tools available for facilitating motor rehabilitation. This review focuses on technologies which can be used to augment movement-related information both to patients as well as to their therapists. A brief outline of the motor system emphasizes the role of spinal motor neurons in the control of voluntary movement and rehabilitative efforts. Technologies which induce passive motion to stimulate spinal motor output as well as technologies that stimulate active voluntary movements are discussed. Finally, we review technologies and notational methods that can be used to quantify and assess the quality of movement for evaluating the efficacy of motor rehabilitation efforts. We conclude that stronger evidence is necessary to determine the applicability of the wide range of technologies now available to clinical rehabilitation efforts.
Address Department of Physical Therapy, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, University of Tel Aviv, Israel. dlieberm@post.tau.ac.il
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0268-0033 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:16198463 Approved no
Call Number Serial 49
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Melzer, I.; Krasovsky, T.; Oddsson, L.I.E.; Liebermann, D.G.
Title Age-related differences in lower-limb force-time relation during the push-off in rapid voluntary stepping Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Clinical Biomechanics (Bristol, Avon) Abbreviated Journal (up) Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon)
Volume 25 Issue 10 Pages 989-994
Keywords Accidental Falls/prevention & control; Age Factors; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Aging/physiology; *Biomechanics; Female; Gait/*physiology; Humans; Male; *Postural Balance; Walking/*physiology
Abstract BACKGROUND: This study investigated the force-time relationship during the push-off stage of a rapid voluntary step in young and older healthy adults, to study the assumption that when balance is lost a quick step may preserve stability. The ability to achieve peak propulsive force within a short time is critical for the performance of such a quick powerful step. We hypothesized that older adults would achieve peak force and power in significantly longer times compared to young people, particularly during the push-off preparatory phase. METHODS: Fifteen young and 15 older volunteers performed rapid forward steps while standing on a force platform. Absolute anteroposterior and body weight normalized vertical forces during the push-off in the preparation and swing phases were used to determine time to peak and peak force, and step power. Two-way analyses of variance ('Group' [young-older] by 'Phase' [preparation-swing]) were used to assess our hypothesis (P </= 0.05). FINDINGS: Older people exerted lower peak forces (anteroposterior and vertical) than young adults, but not necessarily lower peak power. More significantly, they showed a longer time to peak force, particularly in the vertical direction during the preparation phase. INTERPRETATIONS: Older adults generate propulsive forces slowly and reach lower magnitudes, mainly during step preparation. The time to achieve a peak force and power, rather than its actual magnitude, may account for failures in quickly performing a preventive action. Such delay may be associated with the inability to react and recruit muscles quickly. Thus, training elderly to step fast in response to relevant cues may be beneficial in the prevention of falls.
Address Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0268-0033 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:20724044 Approved no
Call Number Serial 51
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liebermann, D.G.; Levin, M.F.; McIntyre, J.; Weiss, P.L.; Berman, S.
Title Arm path fragmentation and spatiotemporal features of hand reaching in healthy subjects and stroke patients Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Conference Proceedings : ... Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. Conference Abbreviated Journal (up) Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc
Volume 2010 Issue Pages 5242-5245
Keywords Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Analysis of Variance; Arm/*physiology; Biomechanics/physiology; Female; Hand/*physiology; *Health; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Movement/*physiology; Posture/physiology; Principal Component Analysis; Stroke/*physiopathology; Time Factors
Abstract Arm motion in healthy humans is characterized by smooth and relatively short paths. The current study focused on 3D reaching in stroke patients. Sixteen right-hemiparetic stroke patients and 8 healthy adults performed 42 reaching movements towards 3 visual targets located at an extended arm distance. Performance was assessed in terms of spatial and temporal features of the movement; i.e., hand path, arm posture and smoothness. Differences between groups and within subjects were hypothesized for spatial and temporal aspects of reaching under the assumption that both are independent. As expected, upper limb motion of patients was characterized by longer and jerkier hand paths and slower speeds. Assessment of the number of sub-movements within each movement did not clearly discriminate between groups. Principal component analyses revealed specific clusters of either spatial or temporal measures, which accounted for a large proportion of the variance in patients but not in healthy controls. These findings support the notion of a separation between spatial and temporal features of movement. Stroke patients may fail to integrate the two aspects when executing reaching movements towards visual targets.
Address Physical Therapy Dept., Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Israel. dlieberm@post.tau.ac.il
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1557-170X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:21096047 Approved no
Call Number Serial 30
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Banina, M.C.; Molad, R.; Solomon, J.S.; Berman, S.; Soroker, N.; Frenkel-Toledo, S.; Liebermann, D.G.; Levin, M.F.
Title Exercise intensity of the upper limb can be enhanced using a virtual rehabilitation system Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Disability and Rehabilitation. Assistive Technology Abbreviated Journal (up) Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol
Volume Issue Pages 1-7
Keywords Stroke; difficulty; exercise therapy; intensity; personalized exercise; upper limb; virtual reality
Abstract Purpose: Motor recovery of the upper limb (UL) is related to exercise intensity, defined as movement repetitions divided by minutes in active therapy, and task difficulty. However, the degree to which UL training in virtual reality (VR) applications deliver intense and challenging exercise and whether these factors are considered in different centres for people with different sensorimotor impairment levels is not evidenced. We determined if (1) a VR programme can deliver high UL exercise intensity in people with sub-acute stroke across different environments and (2) exercise intensity and difficulty differed among patients with different levels of UL sensorimotor impairment.Methods: Participants with sub-acute stroke (<6 months) with Fugl-Meyer scores ranging from 14 to 57, completed 10 approximately 50-min UL training sessions using three unilateral and one bilateral VR activity over 2 weeks in centres located in three countries. Training time, number of movement repetitions, and success rates were extracted from game activity logs. Exercise intensity was calculated for each participant, related to UL impairment, and compared between centres.Results: Exercise intensity was high and was progressed similarly in all centres. Participants had most difficulty with bilateral and lateral reaching activities. Exercise intensity was not, while success rate of only one unilateral activity was related to UL severity.Conclusion: The level of intensity attained with this VR exercise programme was higher than that reported in current stroke therapy practice. Although progression through different activity levels was similar between centres, clearer guidelines for exercise progression should be provided by the VR application.Implications for rehabilitationVR rehabilitation systems can be used to deliver intensive exercise programmes.VR rehabilitation systems need to be designed with measurable progressions through difficulty levels.
Address Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation of Greater Montreal (CRIR), Feil and Oberfeld Research Centre, Jewish Rehabilitation Hospital, Laval, Canada
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1748-3107 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32421460 Approved no
Call Number Serial 106
Permanent link to this record