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Author Liebermann, D.G.; Biess, A.; Friedman, J.; Gielen, C.C.A.M.; Flash, T.
Title Intrinsic joint kinematic planning. I: reassessing the Listing's law constraint in the control of three-dimensional arm movements Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Experimental Brain Research Abbreviated Journal Exp Brain Res
Volume 171 Issue 2 Pages 139-154
Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Analysis of Variance; *Arm; Biomechanics; Eye Movements/*physiology; Humans; Joints/*physiology; Male; Movement/*physiology; *Musculoskeletal System; Orientation/*physiology; Posture
Abstract This study tested the validity of the assumption that intrinsic kinematic constraints, such as Listing's law, can account for the geometric features of three-dimensional arm movements. In principle, if the arm joints follow a Listing's constraint, the hand paths may be predicted. Four individuals performed 'extended arm', 'radial', 'frontal plane', and 'random mixed' movements to visual targets to test Listing's law assumption. Three-dimensional rotation vectors of the upper arm and forearm were calculated from three-dimensional marker data. Data fitting techniques were used to test Donders' and Listing's laws. The coefficient values obtained from fitting rotation vectors to the surfaces described by a second-order equation were analyzed. The results showed that the coefficients that represent curvature and twist of the surfaces were often not significantly different from zero, particularly not during randomly mixed and extended arm movements. These coefficients for forearm rotations were larger compared to those for the upper arm segment rotations. The mean thickness of the rotation surfaces ranged between approximately 1.7 degrees and 4.7 degrees for the rotation vectors of the upper arm segment and approximately 2.6 degrees and 7.5 degrees for those of the forearm. During frontal plane movements, forearm rotations showed large twist scores while upper arm segment rotations showed large curvatures, although the thickness of the surfaces remained low. The curvatures, but not the thicknesses of the surfaces, were larger for large versus small amplitude radial movements. In conclusion, when examining the surfaces obtained for the different movement types, the rotation vectors may lie within manifolds that are anywhere between curved or twisted manifolds. However, a two-dimensional thick surface may roughly represent a global arm constraint. Our findings suggest that Listing's law is implemented for some types of arm movement, such as pointing to targets with the extended arm and during radial reaching movements.
Address Department of Physical Therapy, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, 69978, Ramat Aviv, Israel. dlieberm@post.tau.ac.il
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0014-4819 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:16341526 Approved no
Call Number Penn State @ write.to.jason @ Serial 18
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Author Liebermann, D.G.; Buchman, A.S.; Franks, I.M.
Title Enhancement of motor rehabilitation through the use of information technologies Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Clinical Biomechanics (Bristol, Avon) Abbreviated Journal Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon)
Volume 21 Issue 1 Pages 8-20
Keywords Biotechnology/*methods; Humans; Medical Informatics/*methods; Motion Therapy, Continuous Passive/*methods; Movement Disorders/*rehabilitation; Musculoskeletal Manipulations/methods; Rehabilitation/*methods; Robotics/*methods; Therapy, Computer-Assisted/*methods
Abstract The recent development of information technologies has dramatically increased the tools available for facilitating motor rehabilitation. This review focuses on technologies which can be used to augment movement-related information both to patients as well as to their therapists. A brief outline of the motor system emphasizes the role of spinal motor neurons in the control of voluntary movement and rehabilitative efforts. Technologies which induce passive motion to stimulate spinal motor output as well as technologies that stimulate active voluntary movements are discussed. Finally, we review technologies and notational methods that can be used to quantify and assess the quality of movement for evaluating the efficacy of motor rehabilitation efforts. We conclude that stronger evidence is necessary to determine the applicability of the wide range of technologies now available to clinical rehabilitation efforts.
Address Department of Physical Therapy, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, University of Tel Aviv, Israel. dlieberm@post.tau.ac.il
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0268-0033 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:16198463 Approved no
Call Number Serial 49
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Author Liebermann, D.G.; Hoffman, J.R.
Title Timing of preparatory landing responses as a function of availability of optic flow information Type Journal Article
Year 2005 Publication Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology : Official Journal of the International Society of Electrophysiological Kinesiology Abbreviated Journal J Electromyogr Kinesiol
Volume 15 Issue 1 Pages 120-130
Keywords Adult; Cues; Electromyography; Humans; Male; Movement/physiology; Muscle, Skeletal/*physiology; Posture/physiology; Psychomotor Performance/*physiology; Vision, Ocular/*physiology
Abstract This study investigated temporal patterns of EMG activity during self-initiated falls with different optic flow information ('gaze directions'). Onsets of EMG during the flight phase were monitored from five experienced volunteers that completed 72 landings in three gaze directions (downward, mid-range and horizontal) and six heights of fall (10-130 cm). EMG recordings were obtained from the right gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, biceps femoris and rectus femoris muscles, and used to determine the latency of onset (L(o)) and the perceived time to contact (T(c)). Impacts at touchdown were also monitored using as estimates the major peak of the vertical ground reaction forces (F(max)) normalized to body mass, time to peak (T(max)), peak impulse (I(norm)) normalized to momentum, and rate of change of force (dF(max)/dt). Results showed that L(o) was longer as heights of fall increased, but remained within a narrow time-window at >50 cm landings. No significant differences in L(o) were observed when gaze direction was changed. The relationship between T(c) and flight time followed a linear trend regardless of gaze direction. Gaze direction did not significantly affect the landing impacts. In conclusion, availability of optic flow during landing does not play a major role in triggering the preparatory muscle actions in self-initiated falls. Once a structured landing plan has been acquired, the relevant muscles respond relative to the start of the fall.
Address Department of Physical Therapy, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Stanley Steyer School of Health Professions, University of Tel Aviv, Ramat Aviv, 69978 Tel Aviv, Israel
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1050-6411 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:15642660 Approved no
Call Number Serial 39
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Author Liebermann, D.G.; Katz, L.; Hughes, M.D.; Bartlett, R.M.; McClements, J.; Franks, I.M.
Title Advances in the application of information technology to sport performance Type Journal Article
Year 2002 Publication Journal of Sports Sciences Abbreviated Journal J Sports Sci
Volume 20 Issue 10 Pages 755-769
Keywords *Biofeedback, Psychology; *Computer Simulation; Humans; Models, Biological; Physical Education and Training/*methods; Psychomotor Performance/physiology; Sports Medicine/methods; *Task Performance and Analysis; Videotape Recording
Abstract This paper overviews the diverse information technologies that are used to provide athletes with relevant feedback. Examples taken from various sports are used to illustrate selected applications of technology-based feedback. Several feedback systems are discussed, including vision, audition and proprioception. Each technology described here is based on the assumption that feedback would eventually enhance skill acquisition and sport performance and, as such, its usefulness to athletes and coaches in training is critically evaluated.
Address Department of Physical Therapy, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, University of Tel Aviv, Israel
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0264-0414 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:12363293 Approved no
Call Number Serial 40
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Author Liebermann, D.G.; Franks, I. M.
Title The use of feedback-based technologies in skill acquisition Type Book Chapter
Year 2004 Publication Notational analysis of Sport and Coaching Science Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher E & FN Spon Pub Place of Publication Editor M. Hughes; I.M. Franks
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) Approved no
Call Number Serial 45
Permanent link to this record