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Author (up) Mimouni-Bloch, A.; Shaklai, S.; Levin, M.; Ingber, M.; Karolitsky, T.; Grunbaum, S.; Friedman, J. pdf  url
doi  openurl
  Title Developmental and acquired brain injury have opposite effects on finger coordination in children Type Journal Article
  Year 2023 Publication Frontiers in Human Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Front. Hum. Neurosci.  
  Volume 17 Issue Pages 1083304  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1662-5161 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 119  
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Author (up) Portnoy, S.; Mimouni-Bloch, A.; Rosenberg, L.; Offek, H.; Berman, T.; Kochavi, M.; Orman, G.; Friedman, J. pdf  url
doi  openurl
  Title Graphical Product Quality and Muscle Activity in Children With Mild Disabilities Drawing on a Horizontally or Vertically Oriented Tablet Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication American Journal of Occupational Therapy Abbreviated Journal Am J Occup Ther  
  Volume 72 Issue 6 Pages 1-7  
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  Abstract OBJECTIVE. We compared performance level and muscle activity patterns during shape copying and tracing in two positions, while sitting at a desk and while standing in front of a wall, between typically developing (TD) preschool children and children with mild disabilities (MD).

METHOD. Twenty-two TD children (8 boys, 14 girls; mean [M] age 5 5.2 yr, standard deviation [SD] 5 0.1) and 13 children with MD (9 boys, 4 girls; M age 5 4.9 yr, SD 5 0.5) participated in this study.

RESULTS. The children performed faster and smoother movements when copying shapes on the vertical surface, with no reduction of accuracy, than on the horizontal surface. Children with MD exerted their upper trapezius while performing the short tasks on the vertical surface compared with their muscle activity on the horizontal surface.

CONCLUSION. Incorporating short copying or drawing tasks on a vertical surface may increase the control of proximal muscles and ease graphomotor performance in children with MD.
 
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0272-9490 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Penn State @ write.to.jason @ Serial 91  
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Author (up) Shaklai, S.; Mimouni-Bloch, A.; Levin, M.; Friedman, J. pdf  url
doi  openurl
  Title Development of finger force coordination in children Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Experimental Brain Research Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 235 Issue 12 Pages 37093720  
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  Abstract Coordination is often observed as body parts moving together. However, when producing force with multiple fingers, the optimal coordination is not to produce similar forces with each finger, but rather for each finger to correct mistakes of other fingers. In this study, we aim to determine whether and how this skill develops in children aged 4-12 years. We measured this sort of coordination using the uncontrolled manifold hypothesis (UCM). We recorded finger forces produced by 60 typically developing children aged between 4 and 12 years in a finger-pressing task. The children controlled the height of an object on a screen by the total amount of force they produced on force sensors. We found that the synergy index, a measure of the relationship between “good” and “bad” variance, increased linearly as a function of age. This improvement was achieved by a selective reduction in “bad” variance rather than an increase in “good” variance. We did not observe differences between males and females, and the synergy index was not able to predict outcomes of upper limb behavioral tests after controlling for age. As children develop between the ages of 4 and 12 years, their ability to produce negative covariation between their finger forces improves, likely related to their improved ability to perform dexterous tasks.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1432-1106 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Shaklai2017 Serial 86  
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