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Author Liebermann, D.G.; Goodman, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of visual guidance on the reduction of impacts during landings Type Journal Article
  Year 1991 Publication Ergonomics Abbreviated Journal Ergonomics  
  Volume 34 Issue 11 Pages 1399-1406  
  Keywords Adult; Analysis of Variance; Biomechanics; *Cues; Humans; Male; Motor Activity/*physiology; Psychomotor Performance/physiology; Vision, Ocular/*physiology  
  Abstract While a common view is that vision is essential to motor performance, some recent studies have shown that continuous visual guidance may not always be required within certain time constraints. This study investigated a landing-related task (self-released falls) to assess the extent to which visual information enhances the ability to reduce the impacts at touchdown. Six individuals performed six blocked trials from four height categories in semi-counterbalanced order (5-10, 20-25, 60-65, and 90-95 cm) in vision and no-vision conditions randomly assigned. A series of two-way ANOVA with repeated measures were carried out separately on each dependent variable collapsed over six trials. The results indicated that vision during the flight did not produce softer landings. Indeed, in analysing the first peak (PFP) a main effect for visual condition was revealed in that the mean amplitude was slightly higher when vision was available (F(1,5) = 6.57; p less than 0.05), thus implicating higher forces at impact. The results obtained when the time to the first peak (TFP) was applied showed no significant differences between conditions (F(1,5) less than 1). As expected, in all cases, the analyses yielded significant main effects for the height categories factor. It appears that during self-initiated falls in which the environmental cues are known before the event, visual guidance is not necessary in order to adopt a softer landing strategy.  
  Address Research Department, Wingate Institute, Israel  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume (up) Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0014-0139 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:1800107 Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 55  
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Author Issurin, V.B.; Liebermann, D.G.; Tenenbaum, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of vibratory stimulation training on maximal force and flexibility Type
  Year 1994 Publication Journal of Sports Sciences Abbreviated Journal J Sports Sci  
  Volume 12 Issue 6 Pages 561-566  
  Keywords Adult; Humans; Male; Muscle Contraction/physiology; Muscle, Skeletal/*physiology; *Physical Education and Training; Vibration/*therapeutic use  
  Abstract In this study, we investigated a new method of training for maximal strength and flexibility, which included exertion with superimposed vibration (vibratory stimulation, VS) on target muscles. Twenty-eight male athletes were divided into three groups, and trained three times a week for 3 weeks in one of the following conditions: (A) conventional exercises for strength of the arms and VS stretching exercises for the legs; (B) VS strength exercises for the arms and conventional stretching exercises for the legs; (C) irrelevant training (control group). The vibration was applied at 44 Hz while its amplitude was 3 mm. The effect of training was evaluated by means of isotonic maximal force, heel-to-heel length in the two-leg split across, and flex-and-reach test for body flexion. The VS strength training yielded an average increase in isotonic maximal strength of 49.8%, compared with an average gain of 16% with conventional training, while no gain was observed for the control group. The VS flexibility training resulted in an average gain in the legs split of 14.5 cm compared with 4.1 cm for the conventional training and 2 cm for the control groups, respectively. The ANOVA revealed significant pre-post training effects and an interaction between pre-post training and 'treatment' effects (P < 0.001) for the isotonic maximal force and both flexibility tests. It was concluded that superimposed vibrations applied for short periods allow for increased gains in maximal strength and flexibility.  
  Address Ribstein Centre for Research and Sport Medicine Sciences, Wingate Institute, Wingate Post, Israel  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume (up) Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0264-0414 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:7853452 Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 56  
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Author Hoffman, J.R.; Liebermann, D.; Gusis, A. url  openurl
  Title Relationship of leg strength and power to ground reaction forces in both experienced and novice jump trained personnel Type Journal Article
  Year 1997 Publication Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine Abbreviated Journal Aviat Space Environ Med  
  Volume 68 Issue 8 Pages 710-714  
  Keywords *Aerospace Medicine; *Aviation; Biomechanics; Humans; Leg/*physiology; Male; Military Personnel/*education; *Physical Education and Training; Physical Fitness/*physiology; Range of Motion, Articular; Wounds and Injuries/etiology/*prevention & control  
  Abstract METHODS: There were 14 male soldiers who participated in this study examining the relationship of leg strength and power on landing performance. Subjects were separated into two groups. The first group (E, n = 7) were parachute training instructors and highly experienced in parachute jumping. The second group of subjects (N, n = 7) had no prior parachute training experience and were considered novice jumpers. All subjects were tested for one-repetition maximum (1 RM) squat strength and maximal jump power. Ground reaction forces (GRF) and the time to peak force (TPF) at landing were measured from jumps at four different heights (95 cm, 120 cm, 145 cm, and 170 cm). All jumps were performed from a customized jump platform onto a force plate. RESULTS: No differences were seen between E and N in either IRM squat strength or in MJP. In addition, no differences were seen between the groups for time to peak force at any jump height. However, significantly greater GRF were observed in E compared to N. Moderate to high correlations between maximal jump power and GRF (r values ranging from 0.62-0.93) were observed in E. Although maximal jump power and the TPF was significantly correlated (r = -0.89) at only 120 cm for E, it was interesting to note that the correlations between MJP and the time to peak force in E were all negative and that the correlations between these variables in N were all positive. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that experienced parachutists may use a different landing strategy than novice jumpers. This difference may be reflected by differences in GRF generated during impact and a more efficient utilization of muscle power during the impact phase of the landing.  
  Address Aeromedical Center, Physiological Training Unit, Israel Air Force, Israel  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume (up) Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0095-6562 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:9262813 Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 60  
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Author Falk, B.; Eliakim, A.; Dotan, R.; Liebermann, D.G.; Regev, R.; Bar-Or, O. url  openurl
  Title Birth weight and physical ability in 5- to 8-yr-old healthy children born prematurely Type Journal Article
  Year 1997 Publication Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise Abbreviated Journal Med Sci Sports Exerc  
  Volume 29 Issue 9 Pages 1124-1130  
  Keywords *Birth Weight; Child; Child Development/physiology; Child, Preschool; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Infant, Newborn; *Infant, Premature; Male; *Motor Skills; *Physical Fitness  
  Abstract Recent advances in perinatal care have resulted in increased survival rates of extremely small and immature newborns. This has resulted in some neurodevelopmental impairment. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate and compare neuromuscular performance in children born prematurely at various levels of subnormal birth weight (BW). Subjects were 5- to 8-yr-old children born prematurely at different levels of subnormal BW (535-1760 g, N = 22, PM), and age-matched controls born at full term (> 2500 g, N = 15, CON). None of the subjects had any clinically defined neuromuscular disabilities. Body mass (BM) of PM was lower than that of CON (18.3 +/- 2.7 vs 21.7 +/- 3.8 kg) with no difference in height or sum of 4 skinfolds. Peak mechanical power output determined with a 15-s modified Wingate Anaerobic Test and corrected for BM was lower (P = 0.07) in PM than in CON (5.11 +/- 1.07 vs 5.94 +/- 1.00 W.kg-1). This was especially noticeable in children born at extremely low BW (ELBW, < 1000 g, 4.49 +/- 1.04 W.kg-1, P < 0.01). Peak power, determined in a force-plate vertical jump, corrected for BM was lower in PM vs CON (25.5 +/- 5.4 vs 30.8 +/- 5.2 W.kg-1, respectively P = 0.01), especially in the ELBW group (20.0 +/- 5.5 W.kg-1). Similarly, the elapsed time between peak velocity and actual jump take-off was longer in PM than in CON (41.2 +/- 9.4 vs 35.8 +/- 5.8 ms, respectively, P = 0.04). No differences were observed in peak force. The results suggest that performance deficiencies of prematurely-born children may be a result of inferior inter-muscular coordination. The precise neuromotor factors responsible for this should be identified by future research.  
  Address Ribstein Center for Research and Sport Medicine Sciences, Wingate Institute, Netanya, Israel. bfalk@ccsg.tau.ac.il  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume (up) Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0195-9131 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:9309621 Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 64  
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Author Tamir-Ostrover, H.; Hassin-Baer, S.; Fay-Karmon, T.; Friedman, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Quantifying Changes in Dexterity as a Result of Piano Training in People with Parkinson's Disease Type Journal Article
  Year 2024 Publication Sensors (Basel, Switzerland) Abbreviated Journal Sensors (Basel)  
  Volume 24 Issue 11 Pages  
  Keywords Humans; *Parkinson Disease/physiopathology; Pilot Projects; Male; Aged; Female; Quality of Life; Middle Aged; Motor Skills/physiology; Music; Surveys and Questionnaires; Activities of Daily Living; Fingers/physiology/physiopathology; Parkinson's disease; dexterity; force sensors; music; piano; sonification; training; uncontrolled manifold  
  Abstract People with Parkinson's disease often show deficits in dexterity, which, in turn, can lead to limitations in performing activities of daily life. Previous studies have suggested that training in playing the piano may improve or prevent a decline in dexterity in this population. In this pilot study, we tested three participants on a six-week, custom, piano-based training protocol, and quantified dexterity before and after the intervention using a sensor-enabled version of the nine-hole peg test, the box and block test, a test of finger synergies using unidimensional force sensors, and the Quantitative Digitography test using a digital piano, as well as selected relevant items from the motor parts of the MDS-Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS) and the Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39) quality of life questionnaire. The participants showed improved dexterity following the training program in several of the measures used. This pilot study proposes measures that can track changes in dexterity as a result of practice in people with Parkinson's disease and describes a potential protocol that needs to be tested in a larger cohort.  
  Address Sagol School of Neuroscience, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 6997801, Israel  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume (up) Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1424-8220 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:38894110; PMCID:PMC11174779 Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 124  
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