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Author Uri, O.; Pritsch, M.; Oran, A.; Liebermann, D.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Upper limb kinematics after arthroscopic and open shoulder stabilization Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication (down) Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Abbreviated Journal Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery  
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  ISSN 1058-2746 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 75  
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Author Berman, S.; Liebermann, D.G.; McIntyre, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Constrained Motion Control on a Hemispherical Surface – Path Planning Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication (down) Journal of Neurophysiology Abbreviated Journal J Neurophysiol  
  Volume 111 Issue 5 Pages 954-968  
  Keywords Constrained motion; geodesics; path planning  
  Abstract Surface-constrained motion, i.e., motion constraint by a rigid surface, is commonly found in daily activities. The current work investigates the choice of hand paths constrained to a concave hemispherical surface. To gain insight regarding the paths and their relationship with task dynamics, we simulated various control policies. The simulations demonstrated that following a geodesic path is advantageous not only in terms of path length, but also in terms of motor planning and sensitivity to motor command errors. These stem from the fact that the applied forces lie in a single plane (that of the geodesic path itself). To test whether human subjects indeed follow the geodesic, and to see how such motion compares to other paths, we recorded movements in a virtual haptic-visual environment from eleven healthy subjects. The task was comprised of point-to-point motion between targets at two elevations (30 degrees and 60 degrees ). Three typical choices of paths were observed from a frontal plane projection of the paths: circular arcs, straight lines, and arcs close to the geodesic path for each elevation. Based on the measured hand paths, we applied k-means blind separation to divide the subjects into three groups and compared performance indicators. The analysis confirmed that subjects who followed paths closest to the geodesic produced faster and smoother movements, compared to the others. The 'better' performance reflects the dynamical advantages of following the geodesic path, as shown by the simulations, and may also reflect invariant features of the control policies used to produce such a surface-constrained motion.  
  Address Ben-Gurion University of the Negev  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-3077 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24259548 Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 72  
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Author Lackritz, H.; Parmet, Y.; Frenkel-Toledo, S.; Banina, M.C.; Soroker, N.; Solomon, J.M.; Liebermann, D.G.; Levin, M.F.; Berman, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of post-stroke spasticity on voluntary movement of the upper limb Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication (down) Journal of Neuroengineering and Rehabilitation Abbreviated Journal J Neuroeng Rehabil  
  Volume 18 Issue 1 Pages 81  
  Keywords Gaussian mixture model; Hellinger's distance; Hemiparesis; Kinematics; Kullback-Liebler divergence; Spasticity; Stochastic model; Stroke  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Hemiparesis following stroke is often accompanied by spasticity. Spasticity is one factor among the multiple components of the upper motor neuron syndrome that contributes to movement impairment. However, the specific contribution of spasticity is difficult to isolate and quantify. We propose a new method of quantification and evaluation of the impact of spasticity on the quality of movement following stroke. METHODS: Spasticity was assessed using the Tonic Stretch Reflex Threshold (TSRT). TSRT was analyzed in relation to stochastic models of motion to quantify the deviation of the hemiparetic upper limb motion from the normal motion patterns during a reaching task. Specifically, we assessed the impact of spasticity in the elbow flexors on reaching motion patterns using two distinct measures of the 'distance' between pathological and normal movement, (a) the bidirectional Kullback-Liebler divergence (BKLD) and (b) Hellinger's distance (HD). These measures differ in their sensitivity to different confounding variables. Motor impairment was assessed clinically by the Fugl-Meyer assessment scale for the upper extremity (FMA-UE). Forty-two first-event stroke patients in the subacute phase and 13 healthy controls of similar age participated in the study. Elbow motion was analyzed in the context of repeated reach-to-grasp movements towards four differently located targets. Log-BKLD and HD along with movement time, final elbow extension angle, mean elbow velocity, peak elbow velocity, and the number of velocity peaks of the elbow motion were computed. RESULTS: Upper limb kinematics in patients with lower FMA-UE scores (greater impairment) showed greater deviation from normality when the distance between impaired and normal elbow motion was analyzed either with the BKLD or HD measures. The severity of spasticity, reflected by the TSRT, was related to the distance between impaired and normal elbow motion analyzed with either distance measure. Mean elbow velocity differed between targets, however HD was not sensitive to target location. This may point at effects of spasticity on motion quality that go beyond effects on velocity. CONCLUSIONS: The two methods for analyzing pathological movement post-stroke provide new options for studying the relationship between spasticity and movement quality under different spatiotemporal constraints.  
  Address The Zlotowski Center, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel. sigalbe@bgu.ac.il  
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  ISSN 1743-0003 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:33985543 Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 108  
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Author Liebermann, D.G.; Krasovsky, T.; Berman, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Planning maximally smooth hand movements constrained to nonplanar workspaces Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication (down) Journal of Motor Behavior Abbreviated Journal J Mot Behav  
  Volume 40 Issue 6 Pages 516-531  
  Keywords Adaptation, Physiological; Adult; Algorithms; Female; Hand/*physiology; Humans; *Intention; Kinesthesis/*physiology; Male; Models, Statistical; Movement/*physiology; Psychomotor Performance/*physiology; Reference Values; Writing  
  Abstract The article characterizes hand paths and speed profiles for movements performed in a nonplanar, 2-dimensional workspace (a hemisphere of constant curvature). The authors assessed endpoint kinematics (i.e., paths and speeds) under the minimum-jerk model assumptions and calculated minimal amplitude paths (geodesics) and the corresponding speed profiles. The authors also calculated hand speeds using the 2/3 power law. They then compared modeled results with the empirical observations. In all, 10 participants moved their hands forward and backward from a common starting position toward 3 targets located within a hemispheric workspace of small or large curvature. Comparisons of modeled observed differences using 2-way RM-ANOVAs showed that movement direction had no clear influence on hand kinetics (p < .05). Workspace curvature affected the hand paths, which seldom followed geodesic lines. Constraining the paths to different curvatures did not affect the hand speed profiles. Minimum-jerk speed profiles closely matched the observations and were superior to those predicted by 2/3 power law (p < .001). The authors conclude that speed and path cannot be unambiguously linked under the minimum-jerk assumption when individuals move the hand in a nonplanar 2-dimensional workspace. In such a case, the hands do not follow geodesic paths, but they preserve the speed profile, regardless of the geometric features of the workspace.  
  Address Department of Physical Therapy, The Stanley Steyer School of Health Professions, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel. dlieberm@post.tau.ac.il  
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  ISSN 0022-2895 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:18980905 Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 33  
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Author Liebermann, D.G.; Raz, T.; Dickinson, J. openurl 
  Title On Intentional and Incidental Learning and Estimation of Temporal and Spatial Information Type Journal Article
  Year 1988 Publication (down) Journal of Human Movement Studies Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 15 Issue Pages 191-204  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 54  
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