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Author Merdler, T.; Liebermann, D.G.; Levin, M.F.; Berman, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Arm-plane representation of shoulder compensation during pointing movements in patients with stroke Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology : Official Journal of the International Society of Electrophysiological Kinesiology Abbreviated Journal J Electromyogr Kinesiol  
  Volume 23 Issue 4 Pages 938947  
  Keywords Kinematics; Arm movement; Rehabilitation  
  Abstract (up) Improvements in functional motor activities are often accompanied by motor compensations to overcome persistent motor impairment in the upper limb. Kinematic analysis is used to objectively quantify movement patterns including common motor compensations such as excessive trunk displacement during reaching. However, a common motor compensation to assist reaching, shoulder abduction, is not adequately characterized by current motion analysis approaches. We apply the arm-plane representation that accounts for the co-variation between movements of the whole arm, and investigate its ability to identify and quantify compensatory arm movements in stroke subjects when making forward arm reaches. This method has not been previously applied to the analysis of motion deficits. Sixteen adults with right post-stroke hemiparesis and eight healthy age-matched controls reached in three target directions (14 trials/target; sampling rate: 100Hz). Arm-plane movement was validated against endpoint, joint, and trunk kinematics and compared between groups. In stroke subjects, arm-plane measures were correlated with arm impairment (Fugl-Meyer Assessment) and ability (Box and Blocks) scores and were more sensitive than clinical measures to detect mild motor impairment. Arm-plane motion analysis provides new information about motor compensations involving the co-variation of shoulder and elbow movements that may help to understand the underlying motor deficits in patients with stroke.  
  Address Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1050-6411 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23566477 Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 69  
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Author Issurin, V.B.; Liebermann, D.G.; Tenenbaum, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of vibratory stimulation training on maximal force and flexibility Type
  Year 1994 Publication Journal of Sports Sciences Abbreviated Journal J Sports Sci  
  Volume 12 Issue 6 Pages 561-566  
  Keywords Adult; Humans; Male; Muscle Contraction/physiology; Muscle, Skeletal/*physiology; *Physical Education and Training; Vibration/*therapeutic use  
  Abstract (up) In this study, we investigated a new method of training for maximal strength and flexibility, which included exertion with superimposed vibration (vibratory stimulation, VS) on target muscles. Twenty-eight male athletes were divided into three groups, and trained three times a week for 3 weeks in one of the following conditions: (A) conventional exercises for strength of the arms and VS stretching exercises for the legs; (B) VS strength exercises for the arms and conventional stretching exercises for the legs; (C) irrelevant training (control group). The vibration was applied at 44 Hz while its amplitude was 3 mm. The effect of training was evaluated by means of isotonic maximal force, heel-to-heel length in the two-leg split across, and flex-and-reach test for body flexion. The VS strength training yielded an average increase in isotonic maximal strength of 49.8%, compared with an average gain of 16% with conventional training, while no gain was observed for the control group. The VS flexibility training resulted in an average gain in the legs split of 14.5 cm compared with 4.1 cm for the conventional training and 2 cm for the control groups, respectively. The ANOVA revealed significant pre-post training effects and an interaction between pre-post training and 'treatment' effects (P < 0.001) for the isotonic maximal force and both flexibility tests. It was concluded that superimposed vibrations applied for short periods allow for increased gains in maximal strength and flexibility.  
  Address Ribstein Centre for Research and Sport Medicine Sciences, Wingate Institute, Wingate Post, Israel  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0264-0414 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:7853452 Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 56  
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Author Liebermann, D.G.; Berman, S.; Weingarden H.; Levin, M.F.; Weiss, P.L. doi  openurl
  Title Kinematic features of arm and trunk movements in stroke patients and age-matched healthy controls during reaching in virtual and physical environments Type Conference Article
  Year 2009 Publication Virtual Rehabilitation International Conference Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 179-184  
  Keywords  
  Abstract (up) Motor performance of stroke patients and healthy individuals was compared in terms of selected kinematic features of arm and trunk movements while subjects reached for visual targets in virtual (VR) and physical (PH) environments. In PH, the targets were placed at an extended arm distance, while in VR comparably placed virtual targets were presented via GestureTek's IREX system. Our goal was to obtain further insights into research methods related to VR-based rehabilitation. Eight right-hemiparetic stroke patients (age =46-87 years) and 8 healthy adults (age =51-73 years) completed 84 reaching movements in VR and PH environments while seated. The results showed that arm and trunk movements differed in the two environments in patients and to a lesser extent in healthy individuals. Arm motion of patients became jerkier in VR, with larger paths and longer movement durations, and presented greater arm torsion (i.e., larger elbow rotations around the hand-shoulder axis). Interestingly, patients also showed a significant reduction of compensatory trunk movements during VR reaching. The findings indicate that when targets were perceived to be beyond hand reach, stroke patients may be less able to estimate 3D virtual target locations obtained from the 2D TV planar displays. This was not the case for healthy participants.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 52  
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Author Frenkel-Toledo, S.; Bentin, S.; Perry, A.; Liebermann, D.G.; Soroker, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dynamics of the EEG Power in the Frequency and Spatial Domains During Observation and Execution of Manual Movements Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Brain Research Abbreviated Journal Brain Res  
  Volume 1509 Issue Pages 43-57  
  Keywords  
  Abstract (up) Mu suppression is the attenuation of EEG power in the alpha frequency range (8-12Hz) while executing or observing a motor action. Whereas typically observed at central scalp sites, there are diverging reports about the extent of the attenuation over the cortical mantle, its exact frequency range and the specificity of this phenomenon. We investigated the modulation of EEG oscillations in frequency-bands from 4 to 12Hz at frontal, central, parietal and occipital sites during the execution of manual movements and during observation of similar actions from allocentric (i.e., facing the actor) and egocentric (i.e., seeing the actor from behind) viewpoints. Suppression was determined relative to observation of a non-biological movement. Action observation elicited greater suppression in the lower (8-10Hz) compared to the higher mu range (10-12Hz), and greater suppression in the entire 4-12Hz range at frontal and central sites compared to parietal and occipital sites. In addition, suppression tended to be greater during observation of a motor action from allocentric compared to egocentric viewpoints. During execution of movement, suppression of the EEG occurred primarily in the higher alpha range and was absent at occipital sites. In the theta range (4-8Hz), the EEG amplitude was suppressed during action observation and execution. The results suggest a functional distinction between modulation of mu and alpha rhythms, and between the higher and lower ranges of the mu rhythms. The activity of the presumed human mirror neuron system seems primarily evident in the lower mu range and in the theta range.  
  Address Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel; Department of Neurological Rehabilitation, Loewenstein Hospital, Raanana, Israel. Electronic address: silvi197@bezeqint.net  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0006-8993 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23500633 Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 68  
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Author Banina, M.C.; Molad, R.; Solomon, J.S.; Berman, S.; Soroker, N.; Frenkel-Toledo, S.; Liebermann, D.G.; Levin, M.F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Exercise intensity of the upper limb can be enhanced using a virtual rehabilitation system Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Disability and Rehabilitation. Assistive Technology Abbreviated Journal Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-7  
  Keywords Stroke; difficulty; exercise therapy; intensity; personalized exercise; upper limb; virtual reality  
  Abstract (up) Purpose: Motor recovery of the upper limb (UL) is related to exercise intensity, defined as movement repetitions divided by minutes in active therapy, and task difficulty. However, the degree to which UL training in virtual reality (VR) applications deliver intense and challenging exercise and whether these factors are considered in different centres for people with different sensorimotor impairment levels is not evidenced. We determined if (1) a VR programme can deliver high UL exercise intensity in people with sub-acute stroke across different environments and (2) exercise intensity and difficulty differed among patients with different levels of UL sensorimotor impairment.Methods: Participants with sub-acute stroke (<6 months) with Fugl-Meyer scores ranging from 14 to 57, completed 10 approximately 50-min UL training sessions using three unilateral and one bilateral VR activity over 2 weeks in centres located in three countries. Training time, number of movement repetitions, and success rates were extracted from game activity logs. Exercise intensity was calculated for each participant, related to UL impairment, and compared between centres.Results: Exercise intensity was high and was progressed similarly in all centres. Participants had most difficulty with bilateral and lateral reaching activities. Exercise intensity was not, while success rate of only one unilateral activity was related to UL severity.Conclusion: The level of intensity attained with this VR exercise programme was higher than that reported in current stroke therapy practice. Although progression through different activity levels was similar between centres, clearer guidelines for exercise progression should be provided by the VR application.Implications for rehabilitationVR rehabilitation systems can be used to deliver intensive exercise programmes.VR rehabilitation systems need to be designed with measurable progressions through difficulty levels.  
  Address Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation of Greater Montreal (CRIR), Feil and Oberfeld Research Centre, Jewish Rehabilitation Hospital, Laval, Canada  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1748-3107 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32421460 Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 106  
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